How Restore to Microsoft Azure Works

In this article

    The restore process differs for Microsoft Windows and Linux workloads.

    Note

    Mind the following:

    • If you added the Veeam Backup for Microsoft Azure appliance to the Veeam Backup & Replication infrastructure and you plan to restore Microsoft Azure VMs from restore points that were created using the appliance, the restore works as described in the Performing VM Restore section in Veeam Backup for Microsoft Azure User Guide.
    • [If you restore from backups created by products other than Veeam Backup for Microsoft Azure] By default, during restore, Veeam Backup & Replication creates Generation 1 VMs. Such VMs support only Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) firmware interface. If you restore workloads with Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), Veeam Backup & Replication converts UEFI into the BIOS firmware interface.

    For information on Generation 2 VM support, see Generation 2 VM Support.

    Restore of Microsoft Windows Workloads

    To restore a Microsoft Windows workload, Veeam Backup & Replication performs the following steps:

    1. If you use an Azure proxy for restore, Veeam Backup & Replication powers on the Azure proxy. For more information about the Azure proxy, see Managing Azure Proxies.
    2. Veeam Backup & Replication converts disks of a backed-up workload to the VHD format and uploads converted disks to Blob storage in Microsoft Azure.
    3. Veeam Backup & Replication mounts uploaded disks to the backup server.
    4. Veeam Backup & Replication prepares disks for restore. As part of this process, it enables Remote Desktop rules, configures firewall rules, prepares disks for Microsoft Azure agent installation and so on.
    5. Veeam Backup & Replication unmounts prepared disks from the backup server.
    6. If you use an Azure proxy for restore, Veeam Backup & Replication powers off the Azure proxy after a timeout.
    7. Veeam Backup & Replication registers a Microsoft Azure VM with the prepared workload disks. After the registration process is complete, the Microsoft Azure VM is powered on immediately. Then the Microsoft Azure agent is installed on the VM.

    How Restore to Microsoft Azure Works 

    Restore of Linux Workloads

    For restore of Linux workloads, Veeam Backup & Replication uses a helper appliance. The helper appliance is a small auxiliary Linux-based VM in Microsoft Azure registered by Veeam Backup & Replication. During the restore process, Veeam Backup & Replication mounts disks of a backed-up workload to the helper appliance to prepare disks for restore. For more information, see Managing Helper Appliances.

    To restore a Linux workload, Veeam Backup & Replication performs the following steps:

    1. If you use an Azure proxy for restore, Veeam Backup & Replication powers on the Azure proxy. For more information about the Azure proxy, see Managing Azure Proxies.
    2. Veeam Backup & Replication converts disks of a backed-up workload to the VHD format and uploads converted disks to Blob storage in Microsoft Azure.
    3. Veeam Backup & Replication mounts uploaded disks to the helper appliance that resides in the location to which you restore the Linux workload.
    4. Veeam Backup & Replication starts the helper appliance with mounted disks.
    5. Veeam Backup & Replication prepares disks for restore. As part of this process, it enables remote connection rules, configures firewall rules and so on.
    6. Veeam Backup & Replication unmounts prepared disks from the helper appliance and powers off the helper appliance.
    7. If you use an Azure proxy for restore, Veeam Backup & Replication powers off the Azure proxy after a timeout.
    8. Veeam Backup & Replication registers a Microsoft Azure VM with the prepared workload disks. After the registration process is complete, the VM is powered on immediately.

    How Restore to Microsoft Azure Works